HMAS Melbourne II Trilogy podcast

HMAS MELBOURNE II I/C HMA Ships VENDETTA and VOYAGER. RAN Gannet aircraft are seen operating from MELB.

The Australian Naval Institute proudly partners with the University of NSW (Canberra), the Seapower Centre, the Naval Historical Society and the Submarine Institute in producing the acclaimed Australian Naval History podcast series.

Just released over three weeks have been three episodes which discuss the collisions between the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne and the destroyers HMAS Voyager and then USS Frank E Evans. There are two episodes about the Voyager collision which covers both the maritime aspects and the two Royal Commissions.

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Winner of the Inaugural MacDougall Prize

Sub Lieutenant Theodore Squires, RAN, is awarded with best entry for the Chief of Navy Competition 2019 by Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Mike Noonan, AO, RAN, during Sea Power 2019 inside the International Convention Centre at Darling Harbour, Sydney.

Vice Admiral Michael Noonan announced the winner of the MacDougall Prize for best entry in the Youth Division of CN’s Essay Competition. It was announced at the concluding session of the 11th RAN Seapower Conference at Darling Harbour on 10 October.

The winner was Sub Lieutenant Theodore Squires with his essay The Past, Present and Future of Maritime Trade Warfare. He and the authors of four entries which received Honourble Mentions, who ranged in rank from Able Seaman to Lieutenant, also presented their thoughts in the Young Turks session of the Seapower Conference. The winning entry and a number of other essays will be published in the next edition of the Australian Naval Review. Some will also be published on-line.

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Trade and national security intertwined

2019 Goldrick Seminar

Maritime Trade and its implications for Australias Defence.

Address given by Mr Robert McKinnon

Assistant Secretary, Strategic Issues and Intelligence Branch

 Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

At the turn of the 20th Century, protectionist trade policies shaped the global economy.[1] However, in the wake of two world Wars, the nexus between the free flow of global trade through multilateral agreement and the prospects for peace was recognised by world leaders.[2] Australia’s leadership, participation and influence in the multilateral economic and security architecture that emerged from this realisation underpins our prosperity. 

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Trade and national security are intertwined

Address given by Mr Robert McKinnon, Assistant Secretary, Strategic Issues and Intelligence Branch,  Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to the 2019 ANI Goldrick Seminar.

HMAS Benalla transits down the North Queensland coast while being passed by a large merchant ship during the Minor War Vessel Concentration Period.

At the turn of the 20th Century, protectionist trade policies shaped the global economy.[1] However, in the wake of two world Wars, the nexus between the free flow of global trade through multilateral agreement and the prospects for peace was recognised by world leaders.[2] Australia’s leadership, participation and influence in the multilateral economic and security architecture that emerged from this realisation underpins our prosperity. 

And as Prime Minister Morrison recently highlighted: “everything else stems from the strength of our economy.”[3]

Australia’s trade performance contributes very strongly to our economic prosperity. Trade and national security are thus intertwined. This is a whole of government endeavour, involving many different agencies and many in this room. 

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Protecting maritime trade – a historical perspective

By Vice Admiral Peter Jones AO DSC RAN Retired

From the early days of the European settlement until the first years of the 20th Century, there has been concern in Australia about the interdiction of shipping bound to and from Australia. The threats changed over time from France, Russia, Germany and then Japan. Indeed the need to protect trade and keep our ports open was a major driver for the birth of Colonial navies, the maintenance of the British Squadron on the Australian Station and then the birth of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). While some of the concerns, such as in the case of Imperial Russia was somewhat alarmist, in the case of Germany and Japan it was well founded.

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2019 Goldrick Seminar a success

The 2019 Goldrick Seminar on Maritime Trade and its implications for Australian Defencewas held at the Australian Defence Force Academy on Wednesday 18 September. The highly successful event, in which the Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Mike Noonan gave the Keynote Address (pictured), attracted around 200 attendees. 

Speakers drawn from industry, government, academia and the attachécorps outlined the characteristics of maritime trade in Australia and our region and the implications for Defence in protecting this trade in times of tension or conflict.

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Maritime trade subject of Goldrick seminar

 2019 ANI GOLDRICK SEMINAR . Maritime Trade and its Implications for Australia’s Defence.Wednesday 18 September 2019 

Co-convened with the Royal Australian Navy, the Australian Centre for the Study of Armed Conflict and Society, and the Submarine Institute Australia 

The 2019 ANI Goldrick Seminar will discuss defence issues associated with the maintenance of Australia’s maritime trade. Speakers will be drawn from senior levels of Defence, academia and industry. As in previous years, the theme – Maritime Trade and its Implications for Australia’s Defence – was selected by the Chief of Navy; an outcomes report will be provided to the Chief of Navy and it is anticipated that the proceedings will be subsequently published by ACSACS. 

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2019 CN Naval Essay deadline extended

The deadline for the Chief of Navy Essay Competition has been extended to 27 August 2019. The essay aims to promote knowledge of and interest in a thinking, fighting, Australian Navy.

There will be three (3) divisions with a prize of $5,000 to be awarded to the author of an essay in each division. Honourable mentions may also be made at the discretion of the judging panel.

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