Analysis

Robotic ground-based weapons: systems of the future battlefield

Robotic ground-based weapons: systems of the future battlefield

Flying Officer Gary Martinic, Australian Air Force Cadets

BY CONTRAST to weapons development which has occurred progressively over thousands of years over man’s evolutionary history, the pace with which information technology and electronics has advanced has been truly staggering. This state of perpetual evolution within both of these fields, and its union has led us for the first time in our history, to an age which has become known as the ‘age of the machines’ making both cyberwarfare and robotic warfare, or ‘lethality via remote-control’, completely possible.

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The age of the strike carrier is over

The age of the strike carrier is over

By LT X*

THE age of the strike carrier is over. As the United States enters an era where the potential for modern great-power war is increasing dramatically in Eurasia, a return to the traditional roles of the aircraft carrier is required to maintain maritime access. Carrier-borne over-land strike warfare has not proved decisive in previous conflicts in heavily contested air defense environments, and will not prove so in the future.

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Fall of Singapore – lessons for Australia

Fall of Singapore – lessons for Australia

By Hugh White*
Most of us would agree that the Fall of Singapore in February 1942 remains the biggest strategic shock Australia has ever received, but we pay too little attention to why it was such a shock, and what we can learn from it.

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The fall of Singapore — a maritime perspective

The fall of Singapore — a maritime perspective

By James Goldrick*
THE fall of Singapore reflects failure at many levels, but not in the way most observers think. The British had to fight the war they got in 1939, rather than a war that was yet to happen in 1941. Had the Japanese attacked in the Far East before the Germans attacked Poland, the British would have sent their forces east, however reluctantly. But that wasn’t the order of events.

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Australia and France: an innovative defence partnership

Australia and France: an innovative defence partnership

Nicole Forrest Green speaks with Rear Admiral Bernard-Antoine Morio de l’Isle France’s Deputy Chief of Navy for operations and former Pacific Joint Commander, following the historic signing of an Inter-Government Agreement on December 20th 2016 in Adelaide by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and France’s Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian.

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Larger engineering role for US fleet needed

Larger engineering role for US fleet needed

THE US Navy will need a larger engineering directorate as it grows the fleet in coming years, to avoid problems faced in past ship classes like the Littoral Combat Ship and the Zumwalt guided missile destroyer stemming from the Navy being too hands-off on technical specifications.

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When robots rule the waves?

When robots rule the waves?

Dramatic progress in the science and engineering of robotics, alongside the perceived success of the US’s predator and Reaper drones in Iraq and Afghanistan, has led many commentators to conclude that the wars of the 21st century will increasingly be fought, by industrialized nations at least, using remotely-piloted and autonomous weapon systems. Professor Robert Sparrow and Professor (Emeritus) George Lucas argue that special ethical considerations arise when these are used at sea.

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America’s pending submarine crisis

America’s pending submarine crisis


The future of naval warfare is increasingly shifting to undersea competition, in both manned and unmanned systems. American seapower has excelled in this domain and holds a competitive edge today beneath the waves. But the U.S. Navy, by a combination of compressed funding and potentially crippling procurement cost increases, may not be well positioned to sustain its mastery of undersea warfare, Austin Hale writes..

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