Analysis

The quest for India’s super carrier

The quest for India’s super carrier

By Tuneer Mukherjee*

The recent decommissioning of the aircraft carrier INS Viraat leaves an enormous gap in the Indian Navy’s power projection capabilities. India’s sole remaining aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya will now serve at the vanguard, as evidenced this year by the ongoing Exercise Malabar and the earlier held TROPEX (Theater Readiness Operational Exercise).

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The difficulties of bipartisanship

Foreign policy and defence bipartisanship is a difficult but common theme in Westminster systems. Two articles highlight some of the difficulties: Fairfax columnist Nicholas Stuart looks at Australia and Professor Kim Richard Nossal looks at Canada. Australia Among its many other sterile and irrelevant activities, as we await a new prime minister, parliament is examining the “benefits and risks of a bipartisan defence agreement”. The futility of this is self-evident. The moment either party sees the briefest glimmer of political gold, they’ll rush to trash any pretence of unity. And that’s exactly as it should be. SHARE SHARE ON FACEBOOK SHARE SHARE ON TWITTER TWEET LINK Malcolm Turnbull, backed by special forces, announces a new ADF focus on counter-terrorism in July. Malcolm Turnbull, backed by special forces, announces a new ADF focus on counter-terrorism in July. Photo: Ben Rushton There are two excellent reasons this proposal will never be passed….

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The North Korea nuclear dilemma

The North Korea nuclear dilemma

By Norman Friedman*
Now that the DPRK has developed long-range missiles and what appears to be a hydrogen bomb, what next? Does Kim Jung-un plan to incinerate a US city in the near future? Until now, nuclear powers have avoided war due to deterrence; it sometimes seems that a two-sided nuclear standoff, as in India–Pakistan, considerably reduces the risk of even conventional war. Is that likely to be the case in Korea?

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Cyber, cyber burning bright

Cyber, cyber burning bright

World naval developments Oct 2017

By Norman Friedman*

In October, it was reported that in 2015 a National Security Agency (NSA) contractor had inadvertently compromised the agency’s software both for protecting U.S. cyber systems and for penetrating Russian ones. Quite aside from the damage reportedly done, the story is interesting for its hints of ongoing cyber warfare and for the mechanism used to steal NSA’s secrets.

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Maritime superiority – a history lesson

Maritime superiority – a history lesson

By Dave Andre*

In the spring of 1798, the United States found itself in an undeclared naval war with France. Known as the Quasi-War, this eighteenth century “half-war” holds valuable lessons for maintaining maritime superiority in the twenty-first century.

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Australia-India: the stable, static and newly significant

The Australia-India bilateral relationship has not developed consistently across foreign policy and economic processes in recent decades.
Recent bilateral engagements endorsed or set in place by Prime Ministers Abbott and Modi, and taken forward by Modi and Prime Minister Turnbull include the Comprehensive Economic Agreement (CECA), the Civil Nuclear Co-operation Agreement and the Framework for Security Co-operation.
Regional multilateral engagements, both shared and separate, show either little movement, are stable or are advancing.

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Could submarines be obsolete by 2050?

Could submarines be obsolete by 2050?

This article is adapted from a presentation to the Australian Naval Institute’s 2017 Goldrick seminar.

By Andrew Davies*

Let me start with something nice and uncontroversial. Submarines might be obsolete by the middle of the century. It’s possible that advances in artificial intelligence (AI), detection systems and signal processing, combined with swarming autonomous unmanned systems, could make it effectively impossible for submarines to maintain their stealth. To give just one example, quantum detection systems capable of picking up extremely subtle magnetic signals could be deployed on a large number of unmanned surface vessels, all networked together to provide an essential real-time map of the magnetic field over an extended area.

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PLA Navy’s plan for dominance

PLA Navy’s plan for dominance


By Richard D. Fisher*

Potential modernization plans or ambitions of the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) were revealed in unprecedented detail by a former PLAN Rear Admiral in a university lecture, perhaps within the last 2-3 years. The Admiral, retired Rear Admiral Zhao Dengping, revealed key programs such as: a new medium-size nuclear attack submarine; a small nuclear auxiliary engine for conventional submarines; ship-based use of anti-ship ballistic missiles (ASBMs); next-generation destroyer capabilities; and goals for PLAN Air Force modernization.

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