Analysis

US-Japanese co-operation needed as China rises

US-Japanese co-operation needed as China rises

At current growth rates, China may become a comparable power to the United States in economic and military terms in the not too distant future. In this future world, China will be less constrained than it is today to attempt to coerce other Asian nations to its will. China’s economy may be slowing at the moment, with significant concerns over sustainability of high debt and growth. Notwithstanding, China is still set to overtake the United States between 2030 and 2045 based on the global power index, which is calculated by Gross Domestic Product, population size, military spending, and technology, as well as new metrics in health, education, and governance. An unbalanced multipolar structure is most prone to deadly conflict compared to a bipolar or balanced multipolar structure. Jason Y. Osuga does the analysis.

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India’s security not befitting its stature

India’s security not befitting its stature

By Professor Rory Medcalf*

India’s security structure is plagued by shortcomings when it comes to coordinating its substantial capabilities. If it is to live up to its rising political and economic stature, reform must occur soon.

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Naval power in the 21st century

Naval power in the 21st century

By Matthew Lidz*

The United States is a continental land power bridging the earth between two mighty oceans. Through our presence at home ports in both the Atlantic and Pacific and forward deployed forces in Asia and Europe we can rapidly project naval power to virtually any spot on the globe. Our naval forces deter threats, support economic growth, maintain global political stability and perform vital counterterrorism missions. These missions are essential to 21st century national security.

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Strategy and ship design: history’s lessons

Strategy and ship design: history’s lessons

New technologies may change the way wars are fought at the tactical and operational level, but policymakers and naval officers must organize those developments under a broader umbrella to understand their true application and effects, Harry Halem writes. History demonstrates the need to understand strategy, and a service’s role in that strategy, when modernizing a military force.

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Future of shipbuilding in Scotland unclear

It’s hard not to have your imagination fired by the awesome image of a floodlit HMS Queen Elizabeth squeezing under the Forth Bridge. At a cost of £3.1 billion and without a full complement of jets to fly off its deck until 2023, the Royal Navy’s next flagship may be a white elephant – but as a feat of engineering, it can’t fail to impress.

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Indonesia to expand naval presence near Mindanao

Indonesia to expand naval presence near Mindanao

On 8 June, General Gatot Nurmantyo, Commander of the Indonesian National Armed Forces (Tentara Nasional Indonesia: TNI), confirmed plans to build a military base on Morotai Island. The decision to build the base on Morotai is likely influenced by the strong presence of militant groups in the region, especially Abu Sayyaf. In April, Malaysian and Philippine forces thwarted a large-scale abduction attempt by the jihadist group that was to take place between the Bohol and Jolo Islands around Mindanao, in the southern Philippines.

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World naval developments June 2017

World naval developments June 2017

By Norman Friedman*
THE new British carrier Queen Elizabeth, the first of two, began sea trials in May. She represents the revival of British fixed-wing naval aviation. The last earlier British fixed-wing carrier airplane, the Sea Harrier fighter, was retired in 2006, and the three light carriers have been discarded. Queen Elizabeth is also by far the largest warship ever built for the Royal Navy.

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